206 Zulu - 11th Anni - 1

Northwest Folklife & 206 Zulu Take on 2015 Cultural Focus

Every year we have the esteemed privilege here at Northwest Folklife to dig in deep to a cultural community with roots here in the Pacific Northwest through our Cultural Focus program. Last year we looked at “India and Its People” and the year before that the unions with “Washington Works.” Every year it’s an eye opening and treasured experience and this year is not different.

 “Beats, Rhymes, and Rhythms: Traditional Roots in Today’s Branches” is a powerful Cultural Focus and we are honored to be connected to and working with Seattle’s powerful Hip Hop community – namely, for purposes of this post, 206 Zulu, the Seattle chapter of the Universal Zulu Nation. They will have a helping hand in bringing Folklife’s 2015 Cultural Focus to life this year.

206 Zulu’s focus is to utilize the artistic elements of Hip Hop and urban arts as a platform for positivity and community empowerment within youth and families. They will be celebrating their 11th Anniversary with a series of community events, February 6-8 (you can learn all about these on our Community Calendar here) and in their honor, we’re excited to share a little bit more about 206 Zulu.

206 Zulu's King Khazm206 Zulu co-founder and executive director King Khazm took some time to shed light on his organization, their mission, why the 2015 Northwest Folklife Festival’s Cultural Focus is so important, and what they’ve got planned to celebrate their 11th year. Take a read!

Hi King! Thanks for taking some time with these questions. Tell us, what is your personal relationship to Northwest Folkilfe?

The Northwest Folklife Festival has been an annual gathering spot for myself and peers since around the mid-90s when Hip Hop was first introduced to Folklife. Our organization was established in 2004 and we began a community partnership with Folklife, hosting various Hip Hop events as early as 2008.

 

206 Zulu - 11th Anni - 1What is your elevator pitch for 206 Zulu?

206 Zulu is Seattle’s Hip Hop cultural and community organization that utilizes the artistic elements of Hip Hop and urban arts as a platform for positivity and community empowerment within youth and families. 206 Zulu is also the Seattle Chapter of the Universal Zulu Nation, Hip Hop’s founding family and international community organization that has been pivotal in the inception and expansion of Hip Hop culture since the early 70s.

 

Happy 11th Anniversary! That’s big news. What does this landmark year mean to the organization and its community?

This February 6-8, 2015 we’ll be celebrating our 11th anniversary of 206 Zulu. The anniversaries are our flagship events of the year where we host a weekend full of programming that often includes music performances, workshops, panels, art showcases, local vendors and non profits, and dance competitions and showcases. Hip Hop has many artistic “elements” that it’s comprised of, however it isn’t always combined together. Our anniversaries are special because we unite the elements and bring respective communities together under one roof in the spirit of “Peace, Unity, Love & Havin’ Fun”.

206 Zulu has grown from a very small grassroots community group to an internationally esteemed non-profit organization. We are still “grassroots” in some regards and operate without any full time paid staff, however are so fortunate to have such an amazing community, and programmatically and organizationally have accomplished so much over the last decade.

 

How did 206 Zulu create its community?

206 Zulu’s membership is comprised of musicians, artists, producers, dancers, organizers, teachers, and various people in the community who either love Hip Hop or just want to be a part of something positive that is about serving the greater community. We build community through our interpersonal relationships with friends, families, peers, through our partnerships with other groups and organizations, as well as various schools, community centers, venues and spaces we connect with.

 

206 Zulu - 11th Anni - 2What do you think about Northwest Folklife’s 2015 Cultural Focus?

To see Hip Hop grow over the years and expand in new ways unimaginable has been truly remarkable. I would have never imagined a focus around roots of Hip Hop would be a Cultural Focus at Northwest Folklife. It’s a beautiful thing.

 

What would you like to see in Northwest Folklife’s Cultural Focus programming line-up?

DJ/turntablist exhibitions, live producer showcases, breakdance competitions and cyphers (open dance circles), graffiti and urban art expo, lots of music and performances, spoken word and poetry, drum circles, photography exhibitions, workshops, panel discussions, classes, but also the lineage of Hip Hop, which is just as important. (There is so much!) Funk, Soul, Blues, Reggae, Jazz, Gospel, African rhythms, Salsa, Rock, capoiera, martial arts, comic books, etc.

 

Who needs to know about this Cultural Focus and why?

Everyone – especially people who hate Hip Hop. People who hate it often don’t know the full spectrum of what it is and generally get their perspective of it through the media, which is often a complete misrepresentation of Hip Hop. Think corporate interest/market driven, commodified, materialistic, misogynistic, demonizing, ignorant, etc.

It’s completely understandable if the music of Hip Hop isn’t your cup of tea, but most people don’t see what the full spectrum of Hip Hop is, much less that it’s not just a genre of music.

 

206 Zulu - 11th Anni - 3So, what exactly do you have coming up that the Northwest Folklife community can experience?

Our anniversary is not just about celebrating the organization and its accomplishments, but celebrating our beloved community and the many communities within the community. Bringing people together in the spirit of positivity and community empowerment. Bringing generations together; honoring and preserving the past but also introducing the elders to the newest generations and seeing how Hip Hop and its elements are evolving. Children are present and become inspired while having fun with their families and other children. All of this IS the roots of Hip Hop. Hip Hop has very little to do with what you see on TV and hear on the radio. It’s much bigger than that. That’s why we do what we do and have events like these.

Aside from speaking to the roots of Hip Hop through practice, many of the workshops and panels elaborate and speak to the roots of Hip Hop directly, philosophically and historically.

 

Learn more about 206 Zulu here.

La Peña Flamenca de Seattle

What Is Flamenco?

La Peña Flamenca de SeattleFlamenco as we know it began to be recognized within Spain and internationally during the last half of the Eighteenth Century.  From there, it has followed the same trajectory as a number of other “urban blues” forms, and has become one of the most successful and prominent of those forms.  Think for a moment of American Jazz, Argentine Tango, Greek Rembetiko and Portuguese Fado, all arising from rural or urban conditions of poverty and oppression, moving to the cabaret or nightclub phase in cities, and at length overcoming the prejudices of the more privileged classes and appealing to a world-wide audience.  In the case at least of flamenco, jazz and tango, the forms have been highly developed both musically and technically and have been successfully presented on the concert stage.

In the case of flamenco, however, the roots go back thousands of years and thousands of miles.

Spain has had a vibrant musical and dance tradition since ancient times; dancers from Cadiz, playing what resemble castanets, have been pictured in Roman mosaics.  Spain was one of the Roman Empire’s most important components, but within the millennium before the Roman conquest, it had been settled by immigrant Phoenicians, Greeks, Carthaginians and Jews as well as its native Iberians.  There is a strong possibility that the Spanish art of bullfighting developed from ancient Greek beliefs and ceremonies associated with the bull.  Bullfighting later became one of the important themes of flamenco singing, and members of the same family often go into each profession.

After the collapse of Rome, Spain was ruled for several centuries by the Visigoths.  Spain had become Christianized late in the Roman period, and the Visigoths, although only roughly civilized, practiced Christianity as well.  The country was invaded in 711 by a Muslim army comprising Arabs, Berbers and Moors from North Aftrica, as part of the whirlwind conquest of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern territory by the new religion of Islam.  Under the leadership of Tarik b. Ziyad, all of Spain save for a small portion of the north and west, swiftly fell into  Muslim hands.

In the eighth ninth and tenth centuries, Al-Andalus, as Muslim Spain was called, enjoyed

a remarkably enlightened and tolerant rule by the Umayyad Dynasty under the Caliphate of Cordoba.  The Spaniards refer to this period as “La Convivencia” or the time of living together.

Islam was dominant, but populous communities of both Christians and Jews were allowed to govern themselves locally.  Many Christians converted by Islam, becoming known as Mozarabes.  Culture, especially poetry and music flourished, along with agriculture and medicine.

La Peña Flamenca de Seattle 2All during this time, Christians from the north of Spain were pushing southward, trying to regain their lost territories.  By the eleventh century, they had regained sizeable portions of the north and west of the Iberian Peninsula.

Things took a further turn for the worse for the Caliphate during the eleventh century when two waves of austere Islamic fanatics, first the Almoravids and later the Almohads, invaded from their kingdoms in Northwest Africa.  These invaders found the culture of Al-Andalus decadent, and greatly damaged the culture of tolerance that the territory had previously enjoyed.  Nonetheless, it was the descendants of these invaders who were to rule the ever-shrinking Muslim Spain until their final defeat by the Christians in 1492.

As the Christians began to take back territory from the Muslims, by and large they continued to practice “convivencia” with the Mudejares (Muslims in Christian territory) and Jews, and to respect the high level of civilization of the lands and peoples newly conquered.  This began to change after the conquest of Sevilla in 1248, and in 1391 a horrendous attack against the Jews was perpetuated.  The Inquisition was officially established in Spain in 1478, and in 1492, the same year that Granada fell to the Christians, the Jews were expelled from Spain.  Some fled to the Ottoman Empire, some to North Africa, some to other parts of Europe, and some to Mexico.

The Muslim population of the Kingdom of Granada had been promised that their faith and properties would be respected, but these promises were soon retracted.  By 1502, the Muslims were forced to choose between conversion to Christianity  or exile, much like the Jews.  By 1609, after several rebellions by the Muslim population, they too were expelled.  Most returned to North Africa, where they received a mixed welcome, now being regarded as “westernized” by their new hosts.  Meanwhile, areas abandoned by the Moors became depopulated and impoverished.

But there were many Jews and Muslims who fled into the countryside and mountains, hiding and eventually intermarrying with sympathetic local people.  The Andalusian population of today shows evidence of the intermingling of European, African and Middle Eastern traits.  These people and their musical traditions became a strong component of flamenco.

Close to this calamitous time, around the 1450’s, the Gypsies, or Rom People, appeared in Spain.  We know that several hundred thousand crossed the Pyrenees, and travelled south slowly.  There are Gypsies all over Spain, but most of them seem to have settled in Andalusia.

There are some theories that another wave of Gypsies travelled across North Africa and up into Andalusia while the territory was Muslim but there is no hard evidence of this.

All researchers agree that the Rom originally came from the northwest part of the Indian subcontinent.  They were a wandering tribe, like many still in India.  They travelled to Egypt (hence the name “Gypsy”), Turkey, the Balkans, Central Europe and through France into Spain.

They have been universally persecuted, oppressed, and even enslaved all the way through their travels.  Upon arriving in Spain, they were obliged to stop their wandering and to settle, although until recently there were still itinerant Canasteros living in Spain.

La Peña Flamenca de Seattle 3 It is not surprising that once the Gypsies were established in Andalucia they would have become acquainted with the “underground” Moors and Jews, as well as disaffected and poor Christian Spaniards, and discovered their musical traditions.  Wherever the Gypsies have travelled, they have taken the native musical styles and preserved and embellished them (another example: Hungary and Romania, with heavy Gypsy populations, have a great deal of Gypsy influence in their music).

The next several centuries were extremely difficult for Spain and most of her people.  Much of her economy was weakened by the expulsions and harassment of its industrious minorities; her wealth was squandered fighting wars all over Europe, and her colonies were beginning to agitate for independence.  The plight of Spain’s poor was abysmal.

By the late eighteenth century, the music that was to become known, mostly in its “cante hondo” form, was beginning to become known.  The aristocracy was hiring Gypsy musicians for entertainment.  The occasional traveler in rural Andalusia was making note of this mournful and exotic singing style.

By the nineteenth century, flamenco had “come to town”.  Gypsy artists continued to be hired privately, as they are to this day, but by 1860 certain urban districts in and near Sevilla, Jerez and Cadiz were becoming known for their Cante styles and artists.  The age of the Cafes Cantantes had arrived.  These were “flamenco cabarets”, featuring guitarists, singers and both male and female dancers in formal performance dress.  Many of the styles we will be exploring in the next pages were developed and refined during this stage, and singers and dancers who performed during this golden age are still referred to in songs and poetry that are performed today.

A seminal event occurred in June of 1922.  The composer Manuel de Falla, with the collaboration of Federico Garcia Lorca, Joaquin Turina and Andres Segovia, along with other artists, musicians and writers organized a “concurso de cante”; a contest for singers, in the hopes of stimulating interest among the general public in this art form and encouraging new talent.

Around this time also, flamenco began to be presented on the concert stage.  Two classically trained, Argentine-born dancers of Spanish descent, La Argentina and La Argetinita, although not purely flamenco dancers, raised consciousness of the unique Spanish art form around the world.  La Argentinita staged the flamenco show “Las Calles de Cadiz” with the best artists of the times during the 1930’s.  The public’s appetite for flamenco, along with the artform’s own evolution, has grown exponentially ever since.

 

Experience local Flamenco live, Feburary 21 at Crossroads Bellevue – FREE!

Historical written by Rubina Carmona, Flamenco singer/dancer, La Peña Flamenca de Seattle

Dog Pound B-Boys 1-2015

Who Are The Dog Pound B-Boys?

In case you haven’t heard, we are super excited to be bringing our specially curated cultural performance series back to Bellevue’s Crossroad’s Mall this year. The third Saturday of every month, January-June 2015, your family can experience Northwest Folklife artists live on the Eastside from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. And, the best part… it’s FREE!

We kick things off January 17 with the Dog Pound B-Boys (a.k.a. Vicious Puppies). While many Northwesters may know the Massive Monkees, we think it’s about time just as many folks know all about these guys, so we sat down with them for a little Q&A – take a read:

How did the Dog Pound B-Boy crew form and when?

Six of the seven members were students of Jerome Aparis, a highly recognized member of the Massive Monkees. Our connection was established through his classes and eventually we began performing at talent shows and various other gigs. The group grew up together sharing the same passion and interest. Finally on May 31, 2008 we formed Vicious Puppies Crew. After graduating high school, Vicious Puppies was changed to Dog Pound.

What is the group’s cultural background?

B-boying originated in the Bronx in the mid-late 70′s. Originally it was created to earn respect from ‘the streets’ and to give youth something positive to focus on instead of joining gangs and getting in trouble.

What is one thing you want your community to know about your work?

All of our energy comes from the audience. The more you all give, the better we perform. So get loud and have fun with us!

What can audiences expect to see at your Crossroads performance this month?

The audience will have the opportunity to witness the accumulation of our years of practice and teamwork, all while having fun! We’ll spare the details as a surprise and to keep the audience on their toes.

Who choreographs your work? How do you create a piece?

No one individual choreographs our work. Whenever one member has an idea, we experiment with it and add to it to make it fresh. I believe this is the reason we always have different styles of movements; our work is inspired by seven different individuals as opposed to just one choreographer.

How did you first come to be involved with Northwest Folklife?

Dog Pound has done recent work with a band called Global Heat. The point man for their group, Rob Pastorok, informed us of this opportunity.

Have you heard about Northwest Folklife’s Cultural Focus (“Beats, Rhymes, Rhythms: Traditional Roots – Today’s Branches“)? What do you think?

Today’s society revolves around social and cultural awareness. The 2015 Cultural Focus we believe is a great idea to continue this type of exposure. The fact that cultural awareness is spread through art makes it much more fun.

——————-

FOR MORE INFORMATION about the Dog Pound B-Boys or any of the other artists part of this series, find us on Facebook and ask! We’ll respond.

Folklife 2014 - Friday

Announcing the 2015 Cultural Focus

Every year, Northwest Folklife engages a Northwest community to showcase during the year leading up to the Festival. This ‘Cultural Focus’ allows Folklife to connect more in depth with the people that we serve and empower their artistic expressions and cultural traditions.

We are honored to announce the 2015 Cultural Focus:

Beats, Rhymes and Rhythms:

Traditional Roots in Today’s Branches

This program will explore the cross-cultural roots of arts expressions that have evolved into contemporary cultures today, including an exploration of the traditional roots of Hip Hop.

Folklife 2014 - MondayAfrican and Latin traditional dance, the blues, gospel songs and spirituals, scat-singing of the early jazz days, African-American street culture, word battles, socially conscious songwriting – these are just some of the seeds we’ll be exploring for this year’s Cultural Focus. Hip Hop, first included in Folklife Festival programming in 1994, serves as an umbrella for this program, and ties together many communities from around the Pacific Northwest – some of those that have been representing their cultures and traditions for years at the Festival. The goal is to present a multi-generational, multi-cultural, inter-disciplinary program to educate the Pacific Northwest about the cross-cultural roots of local communities while highlighting Hip Hop’s traditional folk roots.

This program is particularly timely in the state of development of hip hop culture and education, as Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed Hip Hop History Month in the State of Washington this November to honor the culture, lineage and impact of Hip Hop in the Northwest.

“Hip hop began as a youth-led movement and an alternative from violence, drugs, alcohol, racism, and other ills that plagued the

Folklife 2014 - Monday

inner-city/urban communities of color; one that connects people from varied

social and economic backgrounds today.”

During the 2015 Folklife Festival (May 22-25), audiences can experience four days of music and dance performances, panels and presentations, films, visual arts and participatory workshops that explore the world and roots of Hip Hop. We will have the opportunity of celebrating the joyful expression within Hip Hop while challenging some of the pervasive stereotypes that malign the Hip Hop community today. The Program will tie the five key elements of Hip Hop–Music (DJing), Dance (B-boy and B-girl), Storytelling (MCing), Public Art (Graffiti), and Social Awareness–back to the traditional cultural origins of Hip Hop.

We will build up to the 2015 Festival through monthly events that will be held in Seattle and Northwest regions with partnering communities. Stay tuned for our full list of community events leading up to the 44th Annual Northwest Folklife Festival.

Global Heat - by Piper Hanson

Hip Hop History Month is November

HipHop History Month is November - ProclamationIn an effort to honor the culture, lineage and impact of Hip Hop in the Northwest, Governor Jay Inslee proclaims Hip Hop History Month in the State of Washington this November.

WHEREAS, hip hop is a culture that transcends ethnicity, nationality, social status, gender, religion, beliefs and other ineffectual brarriers of humanity; and

WHEREAS, hip hop began as a youth-led movement and an alternative from violence, drugs, alcohol, racism, and other ills that plagued the inner-city/urban communities of color; one that connects people from varied social and economic backgrounds today; and

WHEREAS, the founding principles of hip hop as advocated by its founding family and grassroots community service organizations, the Universal Zulu Nation, are knowledge, wisdom, freedom, justice, and equality, among others; and

WHEREAS, hip hop as a cultural and musical evolution from funk, soul, rock, R&B, blues, gospel, and other diverse sounds, with lineage tracing back to the African diaspora and some of the earliest cultures and civilizations; and

WHEREAS, hip hop positively influences and affects millions of lives through its spiritual, mental and physical manifestations; and continues to provide a means of engagements in education and academics by encouraging participants to delve into the realms of arts, language, business, history, mathematics, science, health, and more; and

WHEREAS, 206 Zulu Nation, the Seattle chapter of the Universal Zulu Nation, helps creative positive spaces for the youth and families of Washington State, using a culture of arts and entertainment to inspire young people to get involved in social action, civic service, cultural creativity, and self-education;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Jay Inslee, Governor of the state of Washington, do herby proclaim November 2014 as Hip Hop History Month in Washington, and I urge all people in our state to join me in this special observance.

Join the Programming Team at Folklife!

Do you love music, arts, and culture?

Are you interested in learning what it takes to program the largest free community arts festival in the nation?

 

The Skablins; photo by Piper Hanson

The Skablins; photo by Piper Hanson

Folklife is now seeking a Programming Intern for the 2014 Folklife Festival (May 23-26, 2014)! The Programming Internship is central to the programming Northwest Folklife has to offer. This Intern plays a key role in ensuring smooth festival production from a programming standpoint.

 

Interning at Northwest Folklife can be the experience you need to gain a career in event planning, festival production, the music industry, nonprofit management, marketing, fundraising and a whole host of other fields. Interns at Northwest Folklife take on a significant role in executing the largest free community arts festival in the nation and learn how to increase visibility and strengthen the sustainability of a nonprofit organization.

 

This internship is from December through June — 20 hours a week.

Interested? Follow this link!

Mark your calendars for the release of Roots & Branches, Volume 5 on December 6th!

Roots & Branches, a series of recordings from Northwest Folklife, presents live performances mined from four decades of Festival performances.

The 2013 Roots & Branches disc features some of the dynamic musical traditions that make Folklife the premier community arts festival in the nation including: Badger Pocket, Renegade Stringband, Shelby Earl, Juliana and PAVA, Soul Senate, Les Pamplemousses, J. Wong, The Sumner Brothers, Vivian and Phil Williams, Eldridge Gravy & the Court Supreme, and The Sojourners!

Volume 5: Live from the 2013 Festival will be available on Northwest Folklife’s website, December 6, 2013, as well as during the 2014 Northwest Folklife Festival, Memorial Day Weekend, May 23-27.
Draft front cover design for "Roots & Branches, Vol. 5"—Septem
Stay tuned for highlighted tracks form the album and more on our website in the weeks to come.

More than 10 fun things to do at CroatiaFest’s 10 year anniversary!

croatiafest

So Many Ways to Take in Croatian Culture at Seattle Center Festál:  CroatiaFest

Seattle Center Festál presents CroatiaFest, 12 p.m. – 8 p.m.  Sunday, Oct. 6, in Seattle Center Armory. Explore and experience the cultural roots and contemporary influences of Croatia through live performances, foods, hands-on activities, and a lively marketplace. Acclaimed dance ensembles and musicians, intricate costumes, art exhibits, tourist information and displays showcase Croatia’s rich past and dynamic present.

CroatiaFest 2013, its 10th anniversary year, celebrates All Things Croatian!  Festival-goers will find an author’s corner, Croatian costume photo booth, and photo cutout opportunities. They may trace their genealogy and learn about the varied history of Croatians across the state of Washington, in communities such as Grays Harbor, Interbay, Spokane, Everett and the Roslyn/Cle Elum area.

The Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra travels from Pittsburgh, Penn. to perform at CroatiaFest. Grcevich, recognized as the premiere tamburitza prim player in the world, has gained fame both in the United States and in Europe through his recordings and performances over nearly 40 years. Acclaimed Pacific Northwest groups Radost Folk Ensemble, Ruže Dalmatinke Orchestra and Vela Luka Croatian Dance Ensemble will also perform.

Expert chefs offer cooking demonstrations of some of the country’s most beloved dishes throughout the day in the west bay of Seattle Center Armory. Three inside and four outside food booths will feature authentic Croatian entrees for purchase.

Seattle Center Festál, a series of 22 celebrations presented by community organizations with support from Seattle Center, considers themes of importance to ethnic cultures in our region, revealing their common forms of tradition and expression, while highlighting their unique contributions to the Pacific Northwest and the world.

CroatiaFest is produced in partnership with CroatiaFest Committee. For more information on CroatiaFest, including a full schedule of events, visit croatiafest.org. Click on www.seattlecenter.com or call 206 684-7200 to learn more about Seattle Center Festál and other outstanding public programming offered at Seattle Center.

 

About Seattle Center Festál

Seattle Center Festál 2013 presents a series of 22 world festivals on weekends throughout the year highlighting the distinct cultures and common threads of ethnic communities in our region through traditional and contemporary art, music, foods, youth activities, workshops and more. This collection of cultural events is produced with the generous support of Coca-Cola, The Boeing Company, T-Mobile, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wells Fargo, Real Networks, and KUOW 94.9 Public Radio. Additional support is provided by 4Culture, Washington State Arts Commission, Seattle Center Foundation and the City of Seattle.

WinterGrass is coming!

This just in from our pals at WinterGrass!!!

wintergrasspic2Hot off the press!!!  See the attached flyer for a list of some of the headline bands at Wintergrass 2014 February 27 – March 2, 2014) !  More to come!  Please share with everyone you know!

How’s  this for an AMAZING lineup for 2014:   Dailey & Vincent, Tim O’Brien and Darrell Scott, Vӓsen (these guys are awesome!!!), Mike Marshall & Chris Thile (can’t think of any better mandolin virtuosos; and they’re performing together…wow!!!), Kathy Kallick, The Kruger Brothers (Jens was the 2013 recipient of Steve Martin’s annual $50K award to a Banjo Player who exhibits excellence in the banjo…..SWEET, and very well-deserved!) , Rushad Eggleston (I love him!), The Duhks, Mollie O’Brien & Rich Moore, Matuto (one of my favorite bands last year), The Duhks, The Cleverlys (hope you saw them last year … I’m still laughing!) and more to come.

The special fee-based workshops on Feb. 27 (WG calls them Intensives) include Tim & Mollie O’Brien, Darrell Scott and Vӓsen. More instructors to be announced!

Reminder for WG volunteers:  Be sure to sign up again online www.wintergrass.org and contact whoever you’ve worked with before (e.g. Dan Mortensen) if you’re volunteering.

Needing to purchase WG tickets?  You can purchase your tickets online (get them while the discount still applies). The weekend pass for youth is very reasonable, so be sure to get passes for your kids and grandkids!

Also, the Sallal Grange in North Bend is having its annual fundraising auction on Saturday October 12.  Hope you can make it to the auction …  it’s tons of fun!!!  Live 60′s/70′s music (attire of the period encouraged!), delicious food, silent and live auctions (auctioneer is radio broadcast personality Bob Rivers), etc. Proceeds help the Grange to continue its dairy drive for the Food Bank, work on Project Linus (blankets for children in distress), scholarships, supporting local food sources, and wholesome community events (monthly contra dance, monthly open mic, monthly community game night and various live concerts).  For more info:  www.sallalgrange.org    Among the great auction items will be two full weekend passes to Wintergrass!

Saturday Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm the Sallal Grange is presenting a concert by Rob Ickes and Jim Hurst. Both are award winning instrumentalists and are nominated this year for IBMA’s awards in their respective categories. They did a fabulous concert at the Grange last year!

CallGraphic1

Now Accepting Performer Applications

CallGraphic1Northwest Folklife invites musicians, dancers, community groups, artists, storytellers, and instructors to participate in the 43rd annual Northwest Folklife Festival, which will take place May 23-26, 2014, at Seattle Center.

If you or your group is based in the Northwest region, including Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Western Montana, this is a great opportunity to share your music and traditions!

The annual Northwest Folklife Festival is the largest FREE community arts festival in the United States. It is presented each year in Seattle by Northwest Folklife, a year-round nonprofit organization dedicated to creating opportunities for all people to appreciate, share, and participate in the evolving traditions of the Pacific Northwest.

Last year Northwest Folklife programmed over 6,000 performers in 65 different genres of music, from Hawaiian to hip-hop. We presented dance performances representing cultures from Ireland to India. We believe everyone is a bearer of folk arts, and we encourage communities to share their cultural traditions, in the hope that interaction with new audiences will enrich the community as much as the audience.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT PERFORMER APPLICATIONS

Interested in how we select bands and performance groups? Click here to read our Programming FAQ.

Still have questions? Email our programming team now.

Jam Hawaiian Style at the Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival

Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival Features A Feast for the Senses 

livealohaSeattle Center Festál presents Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8, in Seattle Center Armory, Mural Amphitheatre and Fisher Roof. The festival provides a feast for the senses as visitors journey through the sights, sounds and tastes of Hawaii.

The Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival celebrates what it means to “live aloha.” Hawaiian music, hula, ono food, Hawaiian crafts, hula, music and flower making workshops honor this special culture. 2013 highlights include:

  • Two stages of live Hawaiian music and hula featuring award winning headlining Hawaiian duo Kupaoa from the island of Oahu!
  • Kanikapila Tent – bring your ukulele or other instruments and jam to Hawaiian favorites
  • Children’s activities at Live Aloha’s Keiki Korner
  • Hawaiian Storytelling Stage where you can hear stories about Hawaiian legends
  • Hawaiian workshops including:  flower making, Hawaiian language, and the art of ukulele and Hawaiian slack-key guitar
  • Musubi eating contest!
  • Hawaiian foods, snacks and marketplace

 

Seattle Center Festál, a series of 22 celebrations presented by community organizations with support from Seattle Center, considers themes of importance to ethnic cultures in our region, revealing their common forms of tradition and expression, while highlighting their unique contributions to the Pacific Northwest and the world.

Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival is produced in partnership with Live Aloha Hawaiian Cultural Festival Committee. For more information on Live Aloha, visit seattlelivealohafestival.com. Click on www.seattlecenter.com or call 206 684-7200 to learn more about Seattle Center Festál and other outstanding public programming offered at Seattle Center.

 

About Seattle Center Festál

Seattle Center Festál 2013 presents a series of 22 world festivals on weekends throughout the year highlighting the distinct cultures and common threads of ethnic communities in our region through traditional and contemporary art, music, foods, youth activities, workshops and more. This collection of cultural events is produced with the generous support of Coca-Cola, The Boeing Company, T-Mobile, Wells Fargo, Real Networks, and KUOW 94.9 Public Radio. Additional support is provided by 4Culture, Washington State Arts Commission and the City of Seattle.