Folklife 2014 - Friday

Announcing the 2015 Cultural Focus

Every year, Northwest Folklife engages a Northwest community to showcase during the year leading up to the Festival. This ‘Cultural Focus’ allows Folklife to connect more in depth with the people that we serve and empower their artistic expressions and cultural traditions.

We are honored to announce the 2015 Cultural Focus:

Beats, Rhymes and Rhythms:

Traditional Roots in Today’s Branches

This program will explore the cross-cultural roots of arts expressions that have evolved into contemporary cultures today, including an exploration of the traditional roots of Hip Hop.

Folklife 2014 - MondayAfrican and Latin traditional dance, the blues, gospel songs and spirituals, scat-singing of the early jazz days, African-American street culture, word battles, socially conscious songwriting – these are just some of the seeds we’ll be exploring for this year’s Cultural Focus. Hip Hop, first included in Folklife Festival programming in 1994, serves as an umbrella for this program, and ties together many communities from around the Pacific Northwest – some of those that have been representing their cultures and traditions for years at the Festival. The goal is to present a multi-generational, multi-cultural, inter-disciplinary program to educate the Pacific Northwest about the cross-cultural roots of local communities while highlighting Hip Hop’s traditional folk roots.

This program is particularly timely in the state of development of hip hop culture and education, as Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed Hip Hop History Month in the State of Washington this November to honor the culture, lineage and impact of Hip Hop in the Northwest.

“Hip hop began as a youth-led movement and an alternative from violence, drugs, alcohol, racism, and other ills that plagued the

Folklife 2014 - Monday

inner-city/urban communities of color; one that connects people from varied

social and economic backgrounds today.”

During the 2015 Folklife Festival (May 22-25), audiences can experience four days of music and dance performances, panels and presentations, films, visual arts and participatory workshops that explore the world and roots of Hip Hop. We will have the opportunity of celebrating the joyful expression within Hip Hop while challenging some of the pervasive stereotypes that malign the Hip Hop community today. The Program will tie the five key elements of Hip Hop–Music (DJing), Dance (B-boy and B-girl), Storytelling (MCing), Public Art (Graffiti), and Social Awareness–back to the traditional cultural origins of Hip Hop.

We will build up to the 2015 Festival through monthly events that will be held in Seattle and Northwest regions with partnering communities. Stay tuned for our full list of community events leading up to the 44th Annual Northwest Folklife Festival.

Global Heat - by Piper Hanson

Hip Hop History Month is November

HipHop History Month is November - ProclamationIn an effort to honor the culture, lineage and impact of Hip Hop in the Northwest, Governor Jay Inslee proclaims Hip Hop History Month in the State of Washington this November.

WHEREAS, hip hop is a culture that transcends ethnicity, nationality, social status, gender, religion, beliefs and other ineffectual brarriers of humanity; and

WHEREAS, hip hop began as a youth-led movement and an alternative from violence, drugs, alcohol, racism, and other ills that plagued the inner-city/urban communities of color; one that connects people from varied social and economic backgrounds today; and

WHEREAS, the founding principles of hip hop as advocated by its founding family and grassroots community service organizations, the Universal Zulu Nation, are knowledge, wisdom, freedom, justice, and equality, among others; and

WHEREAS, hip hop as a cultural and musical evolution from funk, soul, rock, R&B, blues, gospel, and other diverse sounds, with lineage tracing back to the African diaspora and some of the earliest cultures and civilizations; and

WHEREAS, hip hop positively influences and affects millions of lives through its spiritual, mental and physical manifestations; and continues to provide a means of engagements in education and academics by encouraging participants to delve into the realms of arts, language, business, history, mathematics, science, health, and more; and

WHEREAS, 206 Zulu Nation, the Seattle chapter of the Universal Zulu Nation, helps creative positive spaces for the youth and families of Washington State, using a culture of arts and entertainment to inspire young people to get involved in social action, civic service, cultural creativity, and self-education;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Jay Inslee, Governor of the state of Washington, do herby proclaim November 2014 as Hip Hop History Month in Washington, and I urge all people in our state to join me in this special observance.

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PCC Brings Healthy Treats to the Seattle Children’s Festival

We think being healthy is super important and starting early isn’t such a bad idea! We’ve teamed up with PCC to bring some fun, interactive activities for families to enjoy to the Festival. Find the PCC TasteMobile outside Fisher Pavilion where nutritionist Ami Karnosh will be demonstrating how the entire family can help out in the kitchen.

SCF: What exactly is a food retail co-operative and how does it work?

PCC: A cooperative of any type is an organization of people with at least one area of common interest that is owned and operated by its members. PCC began as a buying club in 1953, bringing together families who pooled their buying power for the purpose of purchasing bulk foods at lower prices. Members invest in their co-op through some level of financial payment but many co-ops include the expectation that members will support the co-op’s activity’s with their time and labor. In a retail food co-op like PCC, members support their co-op through their initial investment (a $60 lifetime membership) and their patronage of PCC locations. The interests of members are represented by a board of trustees elected by the membership. At PCC a policy governance model is followed; the board adopts broad policies that guide PCC’s activities, a chief executive officer is hired by the board to determine and manage those activities.

SCF: How is buying from a co-op different from buying from a regular grocery store? How does the community benefit from co-ops?

PCC: At a grocery co-op like PCC, anyone can shop, whether or not they are members. The price paid for products is the same for everyone but a PCC member is entitled to purchase discounts three times during a month; 5% off purchases on the 15th and 16th of the month; 10% off purchases on a day of the member’s choice. A principle of any co-op is concern for community and, in that very important regard, shopping at a co-op is different because the dollars spent by a shopper go beyond just paying for the products purchased; money paid at the check stand helps to pay for the co-op’s investment and support in the community it serves. Just a few examples of PCC’s community support are the PCC Food Bank program, PCC Scrip program and PCC’s donation program.

SCF: From organic, to non-GMO, to gluten-free and locally-grown, what should parents be really feeding their children?

PCC: The food parents choose for their families is a personal choice guided by their own values, dietary needs of family members, and family economics. Parents are urged to select the most naturally produced and minimally processed foods they can afford, and to take time to learn about product ingredients and sourcing, how to maximize food appeal and taste, and how to interest their kids in selecting and preparing the food they eat. Food is more than fuel for our bodies; especially in a family setting, it can stimulate fun, culture, communication and education.

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Meet Singer-Songwriter and Crankie Maker, Dejah Leger

Singer and song-writer Dejah Leger will transport you back to the days of being a child, getting tucked into bed with a story book and a soft lullaby. Although she may perform acoustic lullabies, don’t expect to fall asleep! Dejah pairs her musical stylings with moving panoramic illustrations known as a Crankie. Performing at 4:45 at Loft 2, you will not want to miss this unique performance. To find out more Dejah and just what the heck a Crankie is, check out our interview with her!

SCF:  What inspires you to create the relaxing style music that you do?DL: I was very fortunate to grow up with two parents who both sang lullabies to me as a child.  They would sing cowboy ballads and even pop songs, but they would always slow them down to a slow, soft lullaby tempo. It helped me realize the freedom that I had as a songwriter to shape music to fit a need.  As I sang my own children to sleep, I started to revisit some traditional lullabies in both Acadian French and English, as well as creating some from scratch and putting melodies to poems, like “Wynken, Blynken and Nod,” and even pulling new songs into the lullaby tradition that weren’t there before, like “Mother Earth and Father Time” from Charlotte’s Web.  The simplicity of lullabies is deceptive — the power of lullabies is one of the greatest tools we have in our parenting toolbox, and I hope that my CD can be like having another mom and her guitar sitting in the nursery helping your child rest.  There’s such a drive in our musical culture to dress things up and layer on synth and extra frills, but I really wanted this project to remain as simple and true-to-form as possible.

 

SCF: What message do you hope to share with audiences?

 

DL: Since I pair my songs with a visual art form called a “Crankie,” I hope to show that music is multi-dimensional.  We can feel it, hear it, and in this case, see it.  There’s no limit to creativity! Music doesn’t have to be just sound. It can also be a warm blanket around you, a beautiful picture, a story, a feeling.

SCF: Exactly is a Crankie and what is the process of making one?

 

DL: A Crankie is an old folk-art device. Imagine taking an old TV set, pulling out everything inside of it, then taking out the screen. Instead of the screen, there’s paper or felt roll that scrolls by as it’s “cranked” (hence the name Crankie) by hand from above.  On the inside is a little light that illuminates the paper as it scrolls by!  Although it was once a common story-telling device, it disappeared from our culture almost entirely until just recently.  While it is still a very rare sight, the Crankie is beginning to see a renaissance, and now you can come see one too!  There’s no “one” way to do a Crankie; some people quilt and appliqué, some draw and color. I paper-cut.  Using just an X-acto knife and construction paper, I transform songs and stories into images!

 

SCF: How will families be able to participate with your performance at Seattle Children’s Festival?

 

DL: I love for audiences to sing along with me, and I also look forward to teaching some French words!

 

SCF: Your album titled Hand Sewn Lullabies is so peaceful – probably perfect for cool-down or nap time! Do you ever catch your youngest fans peacefully falling asleep during your shows? How cute would that be!?

DL: I would be thrilled if anyone actually fell asleep!! What a compliment!! With the Crankie as part of the show, kids tend to stay pretty awake and fixed on the pictures, but “calm” is a pretty accurate description of the mood I tend to see most often.

 

SCF: What can festival attendees expect when they watch you at SCF?

 

DL: I get very excited to show the audience what a Crankie is and how it works with music.  Expect to pick up some words in French, learn what happens when a frog asks a mouse to get married, visit lumberjacks in the far north of Quebec, and watch a crow transform into a beautiful girl!

Caspar BabyPants

Kindie Musician Caspar Babypants at the Seattle Children’s Festival

Chris Ballew is known on some stages as the frontman of Seattle’s own The Presidents of the United States of America. However he also has an alter ego… kindie musician Caspar Babypants! He recently took the time to chat with us about his life as Caspar Babypants and what we can expect from his performance at Seattle Children’s Festival. Performing at 1:00 p.m. at the Fisher Pavilion. We are so excited to have Caspar rock the stage!

SCF:Where does the name ‘Caspar Babypants’ come from?

 

CB: I just made it up many years ago. It was my nickname in the early 90′s when I was in an improvisational band in Boston and it stuck!

SCF:  Why children’s music?

 

CB: I wanted to make something mellow and small and that used my love of old music and public domain music and was innocent and not cool or jaded and was folksy and had elements of rock and roll and appealed to a wide variety of people. So when I made music that fit all of those criteria and listened to it I realized that it was kid’s music. I did not set out to make kid’s music. It found me.

SCF:How important is it for kids to learn music? And how should parents and teachers incorporate music in their child’s lives?

 

CB: Learning music is not my thing. I want kids and parents to take a trip and SEE what I am singing about and have a visual experience to my songs. I am not an educator and have no opinions really on how important it is for kids to learn music. I just don’t know much about that topic so I can’t comment on it. Incorporating music into daily life is easy! Put on a Caspar Babypants records and sing and dance!

SCF:Any memorable or favorite memories from performing with Caspar Babypants?

 

CB: Too many to list! One time a kid asked me to play “that song about the little green man in the radio”. I did not have a song about that so I made one up on the spot. After finishing to a big round of applause I asked the kid if that was the song he wanted to hear. He simply said “no”. I laughed all day

SCF:Where do you see the future of kindie music going in the following years?

 

CP: I have NO idea. I only take care of myself really and I am here to stay. My 8th record “RISE AND SHINE!” is out on 9/16/14 and I have the next two in the works for 2015 and 2016 with many many more songs on the way. I guess the future will look like the present only with more music out there to choose from!

SCF:What can parents expect for their kids from Caspar Babypants at Seattle Children’s Festival?

 

CB: Parents should expect to participate WITH their kids in singing along and moving and smiling. But every show is different for me. I have no set list so I play what the room demands. Some shows are quiet and mellow and others are crazy. You just have to come and see!

Ropworks

Pro-Jump Roper Turns Sport to Art

Professional jump-roper and Cirque Du Soleil coch Rene Bibaud is amazing… to put it plainly. This woman can do things with a jump rope you didn’t know were possible. We’re lucky to have her here in our fair city, and even luckier to share her with all the incredible families who will attend the Seattle Children’s Festival. Find her at the Fisher Pavilion at 4:00 p.m. (all ages!) and in our Discovery Zone throughout the day, but first, learn a bit more about her below!

 

SCF: Why jump-roping? What got you into it?

 

RB: When I was 10 years old, a jump rope team came to my school and did a performance. I LOVED it.  My PE teacher started a jump rope team, called the Hot Dogs.  I didn’t make the team the first year, but after some hard work, and willingness to keep at it, I got chosen.  I’ve been a “Hot Dog” ever since.  I toured nationally with the team, won several world championships and then was fortunate enough to be recruited by Cirque Du Soleil.  I toured professionally with a show called “Quidam” Performing with Cirque was a highlight and experience of a lifetime, but when I returned home, I decided to turn my focus to youth motivation and fitness. That’s when I started Ropeworks. Now I teach kids the joy of rope jumping for fun and fitness. And I love it. Jumping rope is an incredible lifetime fitness activity. Inexpensive, portable and perfect. I love teaching kids the tools to embrace this awesome activity.

 

SCF: How can parents and teachers promote exercise in children?

 

RB: Helping kids make a positive connection with any form of physical activity is key.  Putting pressure and focus on skill acquisition or setting expectations way beyond their skill set can create tension and disappointment. Rather, focus on goal setting, best effort and avoiding comparisons.  Let your kids know that when they make mistakes, it’s all part of the learning process.  And finally, emphasize what I call “frequent small successes” This process helps kids recognize that small steps toward a big goal can be rewarding.  So, when a child does one thing right (ie – spins the rope over their head without catching their body) help them recognize that success, celebrate and then move to the next small step. Finally, parents are the ultimate role model. When you are active, your kids are active. When you mess up and can laugh at yourself, your children will learn to do the same. They are always watching our coping skills. There are numerous online resources that can get you and your kids excited about any type of physical activity. www.learntojumprope.com is my site dedicated to helping kids, parents and teachers jump rope skills. Check it out!

 

SCF:  What is the mission behind your company, Ropeworks?

 

 

RB: To share the joy of rope jumping for fun and fitness, through goal setting, best effort and learning to celebrate our differences.

 

SCF: What message to do you want to send to kids through jump roping?

 

RB: Practice and patience.

 

SCF: What can parents expect for their kids with Ropeworks at Seattle Children’s Festival

 

RB: Kids will see me perform, but then get the chance to be involved through audience participation in double dutch and single rope jump rope tricks.  I hope kids will embrace rope jumping as a lifetime fitness activity and understand the importance of the character points made earlier.

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Music Together Brings Fun for the Young Set

Expect a forecast of sunshine at Seattle Children’s Festival! We are so excited for your little one(s) to experience the Sunshine Music Together workshop and get a taste of what it offers. Bring the whole family and join in on the fun at 1:00 p.m., in Loft 4.  Check out our interview with Sunshine director Summer Rognlie Trisler to find out more about the Music Together program and what activities to look forward to at the Festival.

 

SCF: Explain what the Music Together program is and the philosophy behind it?ST: Music Together i

s an innovative music and movement program for children aged birth to five years and their parents or caregivers, that is bas

ed on the belief that all children are inherently musical.  Music Together pioneered the concept of a research-based, developmentally appropriate early childhood music curriculum that strongly emphasizes and facilitates adult involvement. At Music Together we believe that music ability is as basic to life as walking or talking, and that it is every child’s birthright to participate with pleasure and confidence in the music of our culture. We introduce children to the joys of making music instead of passively receiving it from CD’s and television. And because very young children instinctively respond to and imitate their loved ones, the active participation of parents and caregivers – regardless of their musical ability – is an essential part of the rich musical environment we create. Music Together parents discover what a powerful role model they are for their child, just by having fun with the music themselves! And by providing cd’s and songbooks to take home, we hope to inspire music-making in your everyday family life.

SCF: What can parents do on their own to inspire music education and movement activities for their children?

ST: Nothing is more important for a child’s musical growth than seeing their loved ones modeling music making with enjoyment! They don’t care if you sing in tune, they think you have the best voice in the world, but they do care that you model and participate! Around the house or wherever

you spend time with your children, try to incorporate music into your day-to-day activities. Create songs out of brushing your teeth, taking a bath, getting dressed, getting in the carseat – It’s so very simple for us to do, yet profound for your child’s music development. Families will often ask us what type of music they should be playing at home for their children, and we always tell them; “Play what you love. Remember that children learn by watching and imitating you, they are acquiring a disposition for music from you, so if you love rhythm and blues, share that with your child. If you love the Beatles, play the Beatles!” Parents need to give themselves permission to model how much fun music is.

 

SCF: What kind of activities will families be doing in the workshops at Seattle Children’s Festival?

ST: We’ll be encouraging families to unwind and join in with full participation as we lead fun, silly and playful music and movement activities together!  We’ll talk a little bit about what we’re learning and why we do what we do within the song activities.  Our hope is to send parents home with a deeper understanding of their child’s music development, and with some basic tools to help support  that development at home.

 

SCF: What is the most popular/favorite activity in the program?

ST: Singing and moving together in a mixed aged family community setting!  Where else do children get to see a room full of adults circle dancing with bells or crawling around on the floor playfully acting like cats and dogs singing.  Remember children learn through play at this age!  They respect adults who can communicate with them on their level!  We create a fun, informal, playful, developmentally appropriate, non performance oriented learning environment which is musically rich, yet immediately accessible to the child’s – and the adult’s! – participation.

 

SCF: What should parents expect for the kids from Sunshine Music Together at SCF?

ST:  To have a GREAT time participating with their parents in song and movement activities and to be inspired and motivated by the participation of the musical community around them!   We’re all there to model how much fun music making is!

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Inside Afro-Brazilian Martial Art-Dance Traditions in Seattle

With more than 23 years of Capoeira experience, instructor Silvio Aleixo Dos Reis was kind enough to take some time to chat with us and provide more info on the ancient art form. Check out International Capoeira Angola Foundation Seattle’s performance at Seattle Children’s Festival at 11:45 a.m in Loft 3.

SCF:  What exactly is Capoeira Angola? A sport, a game, or a dance?

SDR: Capoeia Angola is an Afro-Brazilian martial art-dance traditions carried by enslaved Africans brought to Brazil beginning in the sixteenth century. Capoeira developed in Brazil as a “dance fight” that combines wit, flexibility and strategy into a graceful and nimble art of both body and mind. Today, Capoeira Angola is an art form that uses the language of movement and music to enhance self-esteem and push our bodies in a healthy way.

SCF:  Why should people learn Capoeira as a form of exercise?

SDR: We teach Capoeira as a fun and engaging art form that promotes the development of coordination, balance, body strength and agility. Through the fundamental elements of cooperation, creativity and natural movements, each class focuses on achievement, leadership and community building.

SCF: Capoeira seems pretty physically demanding, how can young or older people safely get involved with it?

SDR: The different movements of Capoeira can be set up to be done for everybody from all ages. We teach in a way that we have specific movements that we can teach for young people and other movements that the older people can do in a fun and safe environment. In this way different groups can participate in the same class and feel well supported by the instructor and all class.

SCF: Any tips for people who are interested in learning Capoeira?

SDR: If people are interested in learning capoeira, it is very important to do not try to do by themselves. All the movements need specific orientation to do and in the beginning is good to have a instructor and a good school to start. Look for a professional capoeira school and help the capoeira community grow.

In this class people will enhance their musical, physical and social capacities through active and interactive participation.

People will learn:

- How to do basic movements to play the capoeira game

- How to play the percussion instruments like drums, tambourines and the musical bowl the berimbau

- Sing capoeira songs in Brazilian Portuguese

SCF: What can people who attended Seattle Children’s Festival expect from Capoeira?

SDR: For the performance we will be presenting the capoeira angola movements in a circle followed by the music and songs in Brazilian Portuguese. Ten musicians will be playing the instruments and two performers will be doing the movements in the middle of the circle. The performance is going to be an interactive act with the public when they will be invited to sing and play some of the musical instruments with us in a ” learning through practice” process. The capoeira rhythms are easy to learn and fun to dance to, and will be demonstrated during our performance.

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Recess Monkey Q&A

Drew Holloway, Jack Forman and Korum Bischoff join forces to create Recess Monkey – a nationally-acclaimed kindie music trio whose past album “The Final Funktier” was awarded 4 of 4 stars in PEOPLE magazine! This fall, they’ll release their latest album WIRED and one stop on their hectic tour schedule is the Seattle Children’s Festival. Performing at 4:30 p.m. at the Fisher Pavilion, you will not want to miss out on these guys. The whole family will go bananas for Recess Monkey!
Check out this fun Q&A with the band – then mark your calendars for the big day. See you there!
 
SCF: What are your favorite topics to sing about?
 
RM: We’re most interested in celebrating childhood- we love singing about friendships, adventures and finding things to laugh about. We think of ourselves as a multi-layered band with lyrics that will speak to all ages in a family. Our newest songs include odes to “Take Your Kid to Work Day,” time traveling with a Grandpa and compulsive photography.
 
SCF:  How important is it for kids to learn music in school? And how should teachers incorporate music in their lessons? 
 
RM: It’s a really rich subject that gives a lot of kids something to get excited about- and research tends to show that self-directed enthusiasm for a particular focus area is the single most important skill that kids can learn and benefit from. Not all kids are into music- some get the same engagement from art, sports, you name it- but there’s something about music’s unifying principle- it creates these moments that every member of the family can share. That’s a really important thing to us- helping families connect over something as fun as music.
 
SCF:  Besides your own, who are your favorite kindie bands or artists?
 
RM: We love Justin Roberts, the Chicago singer/songwriter; Caspar Babypants from here in Seattle (his songs are gems- every one of them); The Okee Dokee Brothers, The Not-Its, Secret Agent 23 Skidoo and too many more to list. All of these people are making first-rate, extremely entertaining music for the whole family!
 
SCF:  What has been your favorite place to perform?
 
RM: We’ve played about 1000 shows over the last 9 years, so there’s a lot to choose from… but some of the standouts have included the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington DC, Austin City Limits, The Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Lollapalooza, Teatro ZinZanni here in Seattle and, of course, Northwest Folklife!
 
SCF:  What can parents and kids expect from Recess Monkey at Seattle Children’s Festival?
 
RM: High energy dance party with lots of singalong-ible moments and a “greatest hits” collection of songs from all 11 of our albums. We’ll play several songs from last year’s “Deep Sea Diver” and this year’s brand new album “Wired” – songs about being creative and DIY.
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Seattle Children’s Festival

Photo by Christopher Nelson

Photo by Christopher Nelson

The Seattle Children’s Festival will be a free one-day multi-cultural festival located on Seattle Center Grounds on October 12, 2014. By “Celebrating Our Big Neighborhood,” the Festival will bring together local communities that showcase and celebrate families of the Northwest. Families will also have the option of an Event Passport that takes them on an interactive journey through the festival.

We’ll be presenting performances and interactive workshops geared towards families and children of all ages including some of the mostwell loved children’s performers of the Northwest. Various international dance forms presented will include Indian Kathak Dance with Leela Kathak Dancers, West African Dance with Etienne Capko & Gansango, Hip-Hop break-dancing, Brazilian Capoeira with International Capoeira Angola Foundation and more!

Kids will also have the chance to learn and listen to various different music styles including Sunshine Music Together, Hand-Made Crankies, American stringband music, and Simba Marimba.

The Seattle Children’s Festival will also include jump roping with Ropeworks, interactive cooking demonstrations for kids from PCC as well as sustainable farming education with Seattle Farm Co-op, interactive historical exhibits, and various hands-on activities. They’ll have the chance to try out different arts and crafts activities including making their own puppets or toy boats.

Folklife 2014 - Friday

Photo by Christopher Nelson

Don’t forget their dancing shoes – upbeat pop bands from the Kindiependent community such as Caspar Babypants and Recess Monkey will be performing. Stay tuned for more details including our schedule!

Sponsored by:

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Photo by Dan Thornton

FOLKLIFE PRESENTS AT KIRKLAND SUMMERFEST

Northwest Folklife thrilled to be partnering with Kirkland Summerfest to program their Community Stage on Sunday, August 10th!

Celebrating their third season, Kirkland Summerfest will transform Kirkland’s Marina Park into a lively arts destination, a place where friends and neighbors can connect and share in a celebration of community spirit. We’re excited to have the opportunity to showcase Folklife performers in a new enviFolklife 2014 - Sundayronment!

 

Catch some of your favorite Folklife performers that Sunday, including:

11:00 – 11:50 AM: Capoeira Angola

12:10 – 1:00 PM: Grupo Folklorico Guadalajara

1:20 – 2:10 PM: Carrigaline

2:30 – 3:20 PM: Armstrong, Lawton, and Katz

3:40 – 4:30 PM: Joseph Giant

4:50 – 6:00 PM: PARTICIPATORY DANCE: Balkan Dance with Jana Rickel

Folklife 2014 - Sunday

Summertime Fun with Folklife!

The Northwest Folklife Festival comes around but once a year, but we’re here year round! Here’s a few events just around the corner!

Join us at Crossroads Mall
AsianShow

Join us Saturday, July 19th at Crossroads Mall in Bellevue for an evening of dancing through Asia. Learn hand movements from instructor Meloody Xie. This is a FREE event starting at 6:30PM – 8:30PM.

Folklife is thrilled to be p?format=400wartnering with the Kirkland Summerfest, August 8-10 to present some of your favorite Folklife performers on their Community Stage! Summerfest is Kirkland’s largest festival featuring three days of art and music on the waterfront and throughout downtown. Don’t miss 3 days of visual and performing arts, over 50 performances, spectator sports, family rides, and entertainment, over 150 vendors and food trucks on the streets of downtown. Stay tuned for our full line up and more details!

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Folklife was streaming live from many of our stages from the Festival all weekend! Miss a show? Click here to see if it’s there, and listen to many of the hundreds of recordings from this remarkable Festival!Fri_Multigenerations2The Northwest Folklife Festival comes around but once a year, but we’re here year round! Keep up with us on Facebook – we’ll be sharing fun events around town, Folklife news, do a few fun giveaways, and so much more. Plus, we want to hear about the cultural entertainment you love in the Pacific Northwest. Facebook is the perfect place to share.
SAVE THE DATE

scf_logo_Starburst_TransFolklife is hard at work planning our first Children’s Festival! The Seattle Children’s Festival will be a free one-day festival located on the Seattle Center Grounds on October 12, 2014. No admission charge, thanks to your donations and community support! By “Celebrating Our Big Neighborhood,” the Festival will bring together local communities that showcase and celebrate families of the Northwest. Programming will include music and dance performances and interactive workshops from around the world as well as a Hands-on Activity Area.

ALL PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHER NELSON