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2013 Festival Schedule Now Live

Plan Your 2013 Festival Now!

The 2013 Northwest Folklife Festival schedule is now live on our website!

Browse the offerings that take place over four days across more than 24 venues and stages.

Design your ideal personal schedule using our handy tools, then share your calendar to Facebook or Twitter, or email to a friend.

View the Schedule Now

Read more about using the online schedule tool and downloading our new & improved mobile app.

The printed schedule will be available at our office and many local libraries after May 16, and can be found in most home editions of The Seattle Times on Thursday, May 23.

What are you most excited to see at the Festival?
Tell us on Twitter or our Facebook page!

Quilt by Katie Pedersen, photo by Rendy Tucker.

What to See at Folklife #144: The Seattle Modern Quilt Guild

(Many thanks to Chandra Wu for this guest post! The full schedule for the 2013 Northwest Folklife Festival will be available at www.nwfolklife.org/festival/schedule beginning May 1.)

Quilt by Katie Pedersen, photo by Rendy Tucker.

The Seattle Modern Quilt Guild is delighted to share some of its members quilts this year at Folklife.  This opportunity came together very quickly, kind of like our Quilt Guild, which began in the blogging community about 3-4 years ago.  One of our members, Charlotte Clark-Mahoney, has displayed her quilts at Intiman during Folklife for several years, where her notorious tie-dyed quilt has drawn a lot of interest and delighted quilt-lovers. She thought it might be fun to add more quilts to the space this year. Who doesn’t think any space looks better with a handcrafted quilt in it? Not us! We are happy to be invited to display at Folklife and we look forward to sharing some of our work with Folklife attendees.

The Seattle Modern Quilt Guild is part of a national movement in “modern” quilting that while very challenging to define, seems to represent a new generation of quilters that are connected through social media and dialoguing with one another about the relationship between this historic women’s utilitarian craft and the modern DIY art and craft movement. Perhaps modern quilters are exploring the context of their craft more publicly than previous generations of quilters due to the exposure of the internet and mobile technology. We see a lot of modern quilts influenced by modern or abstract design influences, architecture, text and minimalist graphic design.  Some modern quilts are utilizing traditional patterns using modern palettes and graphic prints, while others are conversing with traditional quilt patterns either through reinterpretation or improvisation. The Seattle Modern Quilt Guild had its first show at Island Quilter on Vashon Island last summer, and we will be returning there to exhibit quilts from our guild’s star challenge this June.

Quilt by Becca Jubie at 2012 SMQG show, photo by Louise Wackerman.

Modern quilts appear photographed on personal blogs, Flickr, Instagram or Pinterest, where other quilters and quilt enthusiasts can view them and share their thoughts and impressions with each other. If you wish to become more versed in the folk history and craft of quiltmaking, and its new modern directions, check out the Seattle Modern Quilt Guild blog and the members links on the sidebar, or check out the national Modern Quilt Guild and its member bloggers, or the various flickr groups associated with modern quilts. And if you do link to anyone’s work or become inspired by it, try to share the original inspiration and attribute the original artist or sewist, we love the acknowledgement!

Share your impression and ideas about modernity in the American quilt, using the #seattlemqg hashtag on instagram and/or tweet us @SeattleMQG, and tell us what you think so far. We hope that viewers can contemplate the relationship between our quilts and the quilts that they are already familiar with. We don’t really know what it means to call ourselves modern but we understand why the distinction is being made: just struggling to define what it is can lead to some pretty interesting conversation about modern craft and modern art. Creating new works that stem from this new discussion seems to be the closest I can come to describing what I see in modern quilts and those who sew them. Defining the modern quilting movement is a task that no one involved in it feels entirely qualified or comfortable doing, and I am no exception. Please forgive my attempt to share the importance of it with you while attempting to avoid labels that might marginalize or exclude some of the amazing contributions to modern quilting, and just come see for yourself!

The Seattle Modern Quilt Guild meets regularly and also organizes regular group “sew-ins” for socializing and discussing works in progress.  Check us out at http://seattlemodernquiltguild.com/ and if you start “following” any of our members, let us know you found us at Seattle’s Folklife!

Quilts will be on display throughout the Folklife weekend in the Intiman Courtyard.

 

Chandra Wu is the Vice President of Programs for the Seattle Modern Quilt Guild.  She is a former member of the Vancouver Modern Quilt Guild and began producing quilts when she was expecting her first child in 2001.

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Northwest Folklife Renews Its Partnership with Seattle Center

Northwest Folklife is proud to announce that the organization has renewed its agreement with Seattle Center for another six years. The Seattle City Council voted on Monday, April 22, 2013 to approve the partnership between the nonprofit Northwest Folklife and Seattle Center, an arts, civic and family gathering place that is administered by the City of Seattle.

This six-year agreement is a continuation of an over 40-year long relationship between Seattle Center and Northwest Folklife. The agreement ensures both the presentation of the iconic Northwest Folklife Festival in the center of the city and Seattle Center as the home base for the organization through 2018.

Says Northwest Folklife Executive Director Robert Townsend, “We thank the City for this agreement. It continues the gift of the annual Festival to the people of Seattle and the region for years to come.  Seattle Center has been our presenting partner since the first Festival in 1972, and we look forward to many more years of collaboration and association.”

The combination of City support, voluntary donations from festival attendees, other donations and sponsorships obtained by Northwest Folklife, the work of hundreds of volunteers, and thousands of performers performing for free allow the annual Northwest Folklife Festival to be presented to the public free of charge.

“I am very pleased with Council approval today of the City’s agreement with Northwest Folklife, and I look forward to continuing our partnership in the years ahead. This annual Festival brings together our diverse community in joyful, interactive and highly harmonious ways—and represents the very best in the region’s collective creativity and cultural depth,” says Seattle Center Director Robert Nellams.

Northwest Folklife, in partnership with Seattle Center, will present the 42nd annual Northwest Folklife Festival this May 24-27. The Festival is a celebration of the art and traditions of the region, and provides opportunities for all to enjoy and participate in dance, live music, workshops, storytelling, hands-on family activities and more. More information is available at www.nwfolklife.org.

cherry blossom

Seattle’s Cherry Blossom Festival–Off to Set a New World Record

One of Seattle’s most beloved traditions, the Seattle Cherry Blossom Festival never fails to delight. And with highlights this year that include mathematical oddities, a record-breaking battle between an abacus and a super computer, and an underwater singer, this year sounds like it will be something special! See the full release below for more details.

Seattle Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival

Focuses on Numbers, Underwater Photgraphy, Japanese Foods and More

 

Seattle Center Festál presents Seattle Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., April 26 – 28, in Seattle Center Armory, Fisher Pavilion and Seattle Center Pavilion. Explore and experience the cultural roots and contemporary influences of Japan through live performances, visual arts, hands-on activities, foods,  games, and a lively marketplace.

The 38th annual Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival focuses on the theme of Numbers. Did you know that the name Google was adopted from the word Googol, which signifies the number digit one followed by 100 zeros? Do you know how many zeros a Nivenonagintillion contains? The Festival delves into these and other numeric fascinations. It also will attempt to create a new Guinness World Record involving a challenge between a Japanese Abacus device called Soroban and the Super Computer.

Additional Festival highlights:

  • TOHOKU Through the  Eyes of Japanese photography exhibit, sponsored by Japan Foundation;
  • U.S. premiere – Aquaphoto Concert by underwater photographer-singer, Hiroshi Takano of Osaka, Japan, sponsored by Japan Foundation;
  • Dance and music by the Nago Minori troupe of Okinawa, Japan;
  • Over 60 traditional arts and crafts;
  • Over 30 traditional performing arts / martial arts including Taiko Drummers;
  • Many child oriented hands-on activities including The Kid’s Passport;
  • Japanese foods including:  curry-rice (Japanese style curry), Takoyaki (octopus dumplings), Gyudon (beef bowl), Japanese hot dog, Bento-Box, Manju sweets and gourmet cookies;
  • Updates on the 2011 Erthquake/Tsunami recovery.

 

The Festival was founded in appreciation of 1,000 cherry trees gifted to Seattle by Prime Minister Takeo Miki on behalf of the Japanese government in commemoration of the nation’s bicentennial. It is the first ethnic festival to be held at Seattle Center annually and the oldest in the Seattle Center Festál series.

Seattle Center Festál, a series of 22 celebrations presented by community organizations with support from Seattle Center, considers themes of importance to ethnic cultures in our region, revealing their common forms of tradition and expression, while highlighting their unique contributions to the Pacific Northwest and the world.

Seattle Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival is produced in partnership with Seattle Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival Committee. For more information on the Festival, the Festal series and other public events at Seattle Center, visit www.seattlecenter.com or call 206 684-7200.

 

About Seattle Center Festál

Seattle Center Festál 2013 presents a series of 22 world festivals on weekends throughout the year highlighting the distinct cultures and common threads of ethnic communities in our region through traditional and contemporary art, music, foods, youth activities, workshops and more. This collection of cultural events is produced with the generous support of Coca-Cola, The Boeing Company, T-Mobile, Wells Fargo, Real Networks, and KUOW 94.9 Public Radio. Additional support is provided by 4Culture, Washington State Arts Commission and the City of Seattle.

frenchfest

C’est Bon! Seattle French Fest is March 24

Are you wondering what happened to the Bastille Day Festival? Well, it’s gotten bigger and better, and is now the Seattle French Fest, celebrating all things Francophone. Read on!

Oui à la Francophonie!
Seattle Center Festál: Seattle French Fest

Seattle Center Festál presents Seattle French Fest:  A Celebration of French-Speaking Cultures, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Saturday, March 24, in Seattle Center Armory. Explore and experience the French way of life as it is lived throughout the world through performing and visual arts, hands-on activities, cars, and a lively marketplace.

This first annual Festál event features A Celebration of French Speaking Cultures to promote and raise awareness of Francophone cultures and traditions. Live music, theater and dance well as international food and wine add to the celebration of French culture and regional presence. This inaugural celebration of la Francophonie in Seattle, will feature many of the over 70 member states included in Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie.

Performance highlights include:

Tahitian dance by Te Fare O Tamatoa, Louisiana Cajun music from Folichon, French-Canadian tunes and percussive dance by Podorythmie, gypsy jazz from Pearl Django, and traditional French language songs from around the world by the Alliance Française Choir and the Théâtre Français Choir.

Festival-goers are also invited to informational seminars on French fashion in Seattle with Seattle’s Fashion Incubator, the Canadian Métis in the Pacific Northwest with Robert Foxcurran, the Francophone world with University of Washington French and Italian Studies Chair Richard Watts, French politics with Deputy Consul General of France Corrine Pereira, and readings of French language poetry from around the world with Misa Bourdoiseau of Éducation Française Greater Seattle. Also on the schedule are performances by many of the area’s French language schools, traditional French dictation exercises for both beginner and intermediate levels organized by University of Washington French Studies students, and chef demos from around the French-speaking world.

Creative activites for children of all ages organized by the Alliance Française de Seattle and booths hosted by Biot-Tacoma Sister City Association, Canoe Island French Camp, Éducation Française Greater Seattle, the French American School of Puget Sound, the French Bilingual Association, the French Immersion School of Washington, Maison de France, Seattle International Film Festival, Seattle-Nantes Sister City Association, Théatre Français de Seattle, Vive la France and more will compliment these interactive performances and seminars.

Au menu in the international bistro festures:  Louisiana fried oyster po’boy sandwich, sandwich Parisian (ham baguette sandwich), bisque de tomate (creamy tomato soup), salade de crudités (trio of fresh salads) and Belgian moules frites (steamed mussels with fries).

Seattle Center Festál, a series of 22 celebrations presented by community organizations in partnership with Seattle Center, considers themes of importance to ethnic cultures in our region, revealing their common forms of tradition and expression, while highlighting their unique contributions to the Pacific Northwest and the world.

Seattle French Fest is produced in partnership with France Education Northwest under the auspices of the Consular Agency of France. For more information on Seattle French Fest, visit www.fenpnw.org. Click on www.seattlecenter.com or call 206 684-7200 to learn more about Seattle Center Festál and other outstanding public events offered at Seattle Center.

About Seattle Center Festál

Seattle Center Festál 2013 presents a series of 22 world festivals on weekends throughout the year highlighting the distinct cultures and common threads of ethnic communities in our region through traditional and contemporary art, music, foods, youth activities, workshops and more. This collection of cultural events is produced with the generous support of Coca-Cola, The Boeing Company, T-Mobile, Wells Fargo, Real Networks, and KUOW 94.9 Public Radio. Additional support is provided by 4Culture, Washington State Arts Commission and the City of Seattle.

KCTS9

KCTS 9 Returns as Media Partner for 2013 Festival

Northwest Folklife is pleased to welcome KCTS Channel 9 back as a media sponsor for the 42nd Northwest Folklife Festival. KCTS first joined us last year as our exclusive broadcast television sponsor.

“It’s a natural partnership,” says Folklife Executive Director Rob Townsend. “They have their main office and station facilities right on the Seattle Center campus, the home of the Festival since it began in 1972. We’re delighted to continue this relationship with our neighbors.”

Says KCTS 9’s Hilda Cullen, “KCTS is proud to partner with Northwest Folklife – an iconic Seattle event which for more than 40 years has been the largest free community arts and cultural festival in the country. The arts are vital to a thriving community, and one of our key initiatives at KCTS 9 is to bring more arts and culture-related programming to our viewers. We strive to provide free access to the arts for everyone, so a collaboration with Northwest Folklife is a natural partnership for us.”

KCTS 9 has 1.6 million viewers in Washington state and another 828,000 viewers in Canada. The station has been broadcasting from Seattle Center campus since 1986.